You Must Return Here With A Shrubbery

Wednesday, July 13, 2016

Several years ago, I was enjoying a drink (at a now-shuttered restaurant) so much that I complimented the bartender on my cocktail.  He nodded in agreement and replied, “Shrubs are cool.” I am ashamed to admit I had no idea what he was talking about.  (That’s not entirely true.  There was muddled thyme in my cocktail, so I assumed he was referring to that.)  Only very recently did I connect that statement with the Martha Washington Raspberry Shrub served at City Tavern, even though I have walked by the sign advertising said shrub at least a thousand times.

Needless to say, I am an extremely late-comer to the possibilities of fruit shrubs.  (For those readers who truly are the last people on Earth to learn of them, shrubs are fruit-based syrups mixed with vinegar.) One day several weeks ago, I decided to experiment with some underripe strawberries, using this recipe.  After a little more research, I came about this from Michael Dietsch. Taking Dietsch at his word, I used the cold method for my next shrub.  However, I wasn’t using strawberries this time; I was using rhubarb recently picked from our garden.

IMG_8848

The result was definitely more flavorful, and Dietsch is absolutely correct that the acid mellows in time, but this shrub did not have the viscosity of the cooked one.  I am confident enough in the cold method to use it for any other fruit, but given the texture of rhubarb, I think I would use the “hot” method in the hopes it might further break down and exude its juices.  Nonetheless, Dietsch’s cocktail recipe was much better than the previous, and it made a delicious cocktail with club soda and Bluecoat Gin

Posted by Kevin on 07/13 at 06:30 PM


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